Disengaged_Gap_The world of banking has a term it dreads – NPA (Non-Performing Assets). These typically refer to loans that are at high risk of default.

Your employees are your most precious assets and their best performance is what you bank on to make the organization thrive. The Towers-Watson Global Workforce Study 2012 surveyed over 32,000 full-time workers across the globe and found that only 35% were highly engaged. The rest?

22% felt they were unsupported.

17% were detached.

And a whopping 26% were disengaged.

If you were a bank with over 25% of your assets at risk, the central bank would be all over you with audits, stress-tests and maybe even cancel your license.

If were a manufacturing firm with 25% of your plants breaking down all the time and hardly producing anything, you would declare the units sick and fix them or close them down.

If you were an airline with 25% of your planes flying practically empty you would reroute, optimize, or shut down the routes.

And yet even though over a quarter of your employees are disengaged, you still hope to meet your financial and business goals without a clear well-thought out employee engagement strategy.  Time to call Ethan Hunt?

References and Acknowledgements

The Towers-Watson Global Workforce Study 2012; Post title inspired from the Mission Impossible movie series; Image courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.net.

Presenteeism: “One central consequent of presenteeism is productivity loss, and scholars have attempted to estimate these productivity numbers. While examining productivity decrements, however, it is implied that losses are measured relative to not having a particular sickness or health issue. Furthermore, in comparison to being absent from a job, those exhibiting presenteeism may be far more productive. Nonetheless, a large study by Goetzel et al. estimated that on average in the United States, an employee’s presenteeism costs or lost on-the-job productivity are approximately $255.” (source: wikipedia)

One thought on “Mission Impossible – ‘Presenteeism’ Protocol

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