Architecting Strategic Rewards and Recognition to reinforce Organizational Goals

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There’s so many different worlds /
So many different suns /
And we have just one world /
But we live in different ones (Brothers in Arms, Dire Straits)

One of the biggest challenges faced by HR professionals is to design Rewards and Recognition programs that help align individual goals with that of the organization. A well designed program helps to align individual tasks and achievements with the overall business strategy of the organization and also reinforces organizational values in everyday activities. Companies can thus gain competitive advantage in the market place if their Rewards and Recognition programs are architected correctly through a complete understanding of business goals, organization structure, organizational culture and tailored to meet individual psychology. Continue reading “Architecting Strategic Rewards and Recognition to reinforce Organizational Goals”

5 Employee Engagement tips from the Baahubali Saga

5 Employee Engagement tips from the Baahubali Saga

 

 

 

 

Baahubali 2: The Conclusion has been making waves at the box office. Everyone wanted to know why Kattappa killed Amarendra Baahubali. A story of intrigue, ambition, greed, love, loyalty and everything in between.

Like all good stories, there are nuggets of wisdom embedded in there that leaders can put to good use. So here are five employee engagement tips from the story. (Spoiler Alert: If you haven’t seen the movie, and are planning on seeing it, you might want to skip this post for now and come back later once you have seen the visual treat) Continue reading “5 Employee Engagement tips from the Baahubali Saga”

n:gage Content: Download the 10Cs of Engagement Flash Cards

Ivey Business Journal published an awesome post titled ‘What Engages Employees the Most OR, the Ten Cs of Employee Engagement’

We liked it so much that we have used that post as a reference to make some quick Flashcards for you to use as reference on a daily basis as you go about your work or create communication about Employee Engagement. Feel free to use these in your emails, posters, presentations, mailers et. al.

Download the full set of cards here or copy the URL: http://get.kwench.in/kudos_10csemployeeengagement_/ into your browser.

 

Candies or Charcoal: What is Santa rating your engagement skills as?

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You better watch out, you better not cry
Better not pout, I’m telling you why
Santa Claus is comin’ to town
He’s making a list and checking it twice
Gonna find out who’s naughty and nice
Santa Claus is comin’ to town

(Santa Claus Is Comin’ To Town, Lonestar)

Children around the world are told all year round that if they misbehave, On Christmas day Santa will skip the candies and give them charcoal instead.When companies carry out their annual employee engagement surveys, some managers too get their lumps of charcoal. Surveys and studies comes back with the clear message that ‘People leave managers, not companies

Continue reading “Candies or Charcoal: What is Santa rating your engagement skills as?”

5 predictions about Employee Engagement in 2015

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It’s the almost the end of 2014 and we have seen momentum building in the world of Employee Engagement. The approach is maturing. More people are actually talking about it as a strategic requirement. Growth is picking up in markets across the world.

Employees matter more than ever. Workforces are now a complex mix of generational cohorts in transition. Based on what I have seen – trends, surveys, feedback from our (rather large) client base, and the “buzz” we hear, I am going to take a stab at predicting the five things I expect to happen in the world of Employee Engagement in 2015.

The quick list:

  1. The Bell-Curve will still rule (and continue to disengage)
  2. SaaS adoption will increase in HR, especially in world of Employee Engagement.
  3. Gamification will make inroads into mainstream processes but diffusion will hurt impact.
  4. Health and Wellness will (finally) become an Employee Engagement topic.
  5. Employee Engagement will go beyond just handing out Rewards.

 

5_PredsEE_2015_LowRes copy 2The more colorful fun (and detailed) version is here (Use the Presentation Mode, its really awesome)

The downloadable single image version is here. (Feel free to chop into pieces and use in your own presentations etc. I only ask that you link back to this post or the kwench website)

 

Employee Alignment-Zone: “The Time Element”

The Architect – Precisely. As you are undoubtedly gathering, the anomaly is systemic, creating fluctuations in even the most simplistic equations.

 Neo – Choice. The problem is choice. (Matrix Reloaded, 2003)

On this blog and in quite a few conversations, I have pointed out the risks of overtly relying on cohorts or grouping of employees to formulate an employee engagement strategy. Using segments and cohorts to understand broad behavior and drivers of engagement is okay, but trying to engage the individual based only on those conclusions is not the best approach.

As ‘Neo’ puts it in the movie Matrix Reloaded , the ‘problem’ is Choice or to be more accurate, in this case – individuality. Every employee is an individual with her own priorities, preferences, fears and responsibilities.

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Work, forms an important part of an employees life – and the emphasis I place is on ‘part’ and not on ‘important’ because that aspect is the one that often gets missed out when employee engagement strategies or initiatives are designed. As an individual with family, friends, interests, hobbies, ambitions and aspirations – responsibilities at work represent just a fraction of the things that matter to the employee.

There are a bunch of things that are important to the employee (health, financial well being, spending time with family, a social life, learning new things, new experiences) and there are things are important to the organization (employee well being, profits, playing an important role in the society, innovation).

When an employee is at work, he is operating in the intersection of these two spheres – there are things that matter to him which align with what matters to the organization. When this overlap is driven by the correct factors (alignment on the larger picture, the direction the company is taking, quality of work, the work culture etc.), there is a zone of alignment that is sustaining (and empowering).

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When what matters to the organization (as perceived by the employee) starts to drift away from what matters to the employee as an individual, this overlap reduces, the zone of alignment starts to shrink and becomes unsustainable. This is when disillusionment sets in eventually leading to Disengagement if corrective measures are not taken.

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Too much of something:

The logical question that follows is what when there is perfect alignment – shouldn’t that be the ideal state? To borrow (somewhat incorrectly) from that age-old adage, “Too much of anything isn’t good for you”

A situation where an individual is completely (and only) aligned with what matters for the organization makes him dysfunctional in other things that should matter to him. If the last line reminds you of the uptight, always-on-the-edge, hard driving, ranting and screaming executive, you are bang-on.

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The other (unintended) consequence of such a situation is that individual then subsumes his discretion to what seems best for the organization. Being too focused on one aspect inevitably leads to a myopic vision of what is correct. It is the healthy balance of all aspects in ones life that helps drive a balanced approach towards challenges – both personal and at work.

A ‘super-mom’ I know uses negotiation skills learnt at work with her 1-year-old infant (works most of the time) and then takes the lessons learnt from handling the concerns of parents, her husband, siblings back to work to engage with her multi-generational team. Imagine what would happen if she tried a time-sheet driven approach with her infant or never took time out to spend time with her parents or spouse but focused only fixing “issues” at work (of which there never seems to be any dearth).

 

The Time Element:

Unlike organizations, what ‘matters’ to an individual is in a state of flux. I am not talking of value systems, or ambitions – those are (hopefully) rather fixed. I am referring to the drivers of what is a priority. Companies and Institutions have stated goals at time of creation and (usually) those drive everything they do. People on the other hand have changing preferences and changing events and these affect the overlap and consequently the alignment they have with the organization.

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If the organization stays rigid on how it interacts with the employee, then the extent of alignment is bound to change. Again an increased degree of alignment is not necessarily a good thing.

A few years ago I got chatting with a senior executive at a party. He was really good what he did, and totally disengaged. He was so efficient at what he did that the organization was reluctant to consider what his own personal aspirations were and had kept him doing the same thing for years on end. “The Gap of Disengagement” was very clear and he was looking to quit because he realized that by staying on he was damaging himself and the organization through his disengagement. I ran into him two years later in a busy airport and was surprised that he was still with the same organization in the same role. When I quizzed him, he confessed that he was still disillusioned but a personal crisis had made it impossible for him to look for other possibilities. His efficiency gave him more time at home and so he compromised his ambitions to stay on with his employer. The executive’s alignment with his employer had increased, but it was driven purely by convenience.

Smart organizations would avoid this situation by being aware of various dimensions of what drives each employee. DIY Pulse surveys are a good way; Managers who listen to their team members and do something about their concerns are even better.

A static employee engagement program is not enough neither is a “one-size-fits-all” approach. Like ‘generically designed’ antibiotics can have unexpected nasty side-effects in patients, employee engagement strategies designed for ‘masses’, ‘cohorts’ or ‘segments’ can induce the reverse effect. The pharmaceutical industry has woken up to the importance of pharmacogenomics to counter the ill effects of ‘universal-design’ for medicines – its time for HR professionals to follow suit.

Acknowledgements: 

Post title inspired by the Twilight Zone series (1958)

Impact of Role Relevance-Competence Fit on Engagement

Every hour and every day I’m learning more/The more I learn, the less I know about before/The less I know, the more I want to look around/Digging deep for clues on higher ground (Higher Ground, UB40)

In my post yesterday I talked about the ABC Drivers of Intrinsic Motivation. (Achievement, Belief and Camaraderie). A sense of achievement is something you derive by, among other things, being in the job/role that is right for you and then being very good at it.

The 2×2 grid (yes, blame it on the B-school stint) below shows how where you lie on the Role-Relevance and Role-Competency axes will determine your sense of achievement.

RRRC_Matrix_Relevance:Low, Competence:Low – Disengaged Employee: If an employee is in the third quadrant i.e he is placed in a role that he doesn’t like and also does not have the skills to perform then he is effectively being setup for failure and will be highly disengaged as he has little motivation to do a good job. If an employee finds himself in this situation then it is a failure of the organization and specially his immediate supervisors more than his own.

Relevance:Low, Competence:High – Efficient Employee: If an employee finds that he has a role that he doesn’t like but is good at then he is efficient at his job but is not engaged. He will do assigned tasks well and deliver on time, but will not be motivated to put in discretionary effort. Good managers can make a difference by listening and understanding what truly motivates their team members and finding a way to move them from Q1 to Q2 or Q3

Relevance:High, Competence:Low – Motivated Employee: When an employee is in a role or team which he wants to be in but is not trained for then he is motivated (but not competent). By providing the right training and support, employees who are in this quadrant can be easily moved into the ideal situation – into Q2.

Relevance:High, Competence:High – Engaged Employee: This is when employees are motivated to give their best to the job. They are in a role they want to be in and have the required training and competence to deliver results. When employees are in this quadrant, their sense of achievement is the maximum.

 Companies on the 2013 list of Fortune 100 Best Companies to Work for, offered 66.5 hours of training annually for salaried employees, with around 70% of those hours devoted to employees’ current roles and nearly 40% focused on growth and development.

Organizations that are not bound by rigid hierarchies and siloed org-structures have the flexibility to, better engage their employees by investing in training and having the opportunity to move them to roles they prefer. These are exactly the kind of facts that a good Employee Engagement Survey should throw up.

RRRC-Transition_

It is not a coincidence that a majority of the top rated employers also have the highest investments in learning. These organizations know that investing in engaging employees with the right role and competency fit, also prevents a ‘brain-drain.’ Employees in all age-groups and roles need continuous support to expand their skills. Investing in skills and knowledge training, of employees communicates a sense of commitment by the organizations in the future of its employees and goes a long way towards fostering a sense of achievement.